Los ciclistas en Londres “activamente en contra” de la construcción de carriles-bici.

Posted on 30 enero 2009. Filed under: Londres | Etiquetas: , , , , |

Obtenido de Local Transport Today:

Hackney shows you don’t have to have lots of cycling infrastructure to get more people on bikes
by Gary Cummins

Cycling is growing faster in the London Borough of Hackney than anywhere else in the UK yet planners and transport professionals visiting this borough with a view to imitating its success on their own turf may be surprised to see little in the way of conspicuous cycle facilities. Danish style cycle tracks are nowhere to be found, and the 1000-strong local cyclists group, the London Cycling Campaign in Hackney, actively lobbies against the installation of cycle lanes.

¿Comorrl…? ¿Ciclistas que se oponen activamente a la construcción de carriles-bici? ¡¿Pero a donde vamos a parar?!

That the penny has dropped regarding cycling as transport in London is well known, but the reasons behind this success story are less clear, often being (incorrectly) put down to the development of a comprehensive network of segregated cycle routes. Attend any transport conference with a speaker endorsing the success of London and chances are they will present a slide of a London Cycle Network + (LCN+) route showing a section of segregation in Bloomsbury. Certainly some segregation within the LCN+ does exist, but these sections account for only a tiny proportion of that network; probably amounting to not even one percent of the total. Outside of the occasional section of pedestrian-cyclist segregation in local parks there are few cycle lanes or tracks in Hackney itself where the cycling modal share is ten percent and rising.

Imposible. ¿Pero cómo van a tener un 10% de bicis en el tráfico sin carriles-bici? anda ya… eso sólo puede pasar en sitios como Sevilla, donde, como todo el mundo sabe, tienen a 90.000 ciclistas metidos en 18 km de carril-bici (Así que salen a 83 cm de carril-bici por ciclista: deben tener un carril-atasco de no te menees).

Of all the London Cycling Campaign borough groups, Hackney’s is the largest. They have benefited from a longstanding and consistent core of activists creating a mature and confident lobby group that speaks with some authority on what it believes to be the key issues behind the success of the bicycle as transport in this part of London.

¡Caramba! ¡”Un grupo de activistas maduro que habla con cierta autoridad sobre los asuntos clave que afectan a la bicicleta”! ¡Suena como exactamente lo contrario de un grupo de niñatos carrilbicistas que gritan consignas descerebradas sobre trivialidades como “carril-bici ya en toda la ciudá”!

Like many success stories, it is due to a combination of factors. These include: the Congestion Charge; a positive press reaction to the increase in cycle use; the free TfL London Cycle Guide maps and better bus lanes. Along with this there is peer observation (the general `fashionableness’ of cycling in London) and the cycling lobby developing a trusting and respectful relationship with local authority officers.

However there are other factors that may be less familiar to a visiting planner: `permeability’ and what Hackney’s cyclists call `invisible engineering’ .

¿”Ingeniería invisible”? ¿Qué chorrada es esa? ¡Si todo el mundo sabe que los carriles-bici cuanto más visibles y aparatosos y estorbantes del tráfico (y de los peatones) sean, mejor, porque es a base de ser visibles, aparatosos y estorbantes como “dan visibilidad” y “protegen” a los ciclistas!

Local cyclists describe permeability as `maximum route choice with minimum diversion’. For cyclists the bicycle performs best when it is used to travel as directly as possible to the desired destination. Diversions are a waste of time and energy. For a commuter with a 4-5 mile journey the occasional detour may be acceptable, but a journey that involves travelling around three sides of a square to avoid a priority junction becomes unnecessarily tiresome.

According to Trevor Parsons, the co-ordinator of The London Cycling Campaign in Hackney, the restoration of permeability to non-motor traffic through parts of the borough, along with engineering measures to reduce traffic speeds, have been among the most influential physical interventions carried out. By their nature these measures are almost undetectable to anybody seeking out what might be termed `typical’ cycle facilities. Rather, Hackney’s cyclists and their borough officers have developed a consensus which seeks to avoid what they consider to be tokenistic, and in the long term potentially harmful, engineering solutions such as cycle lanes and tracks.

¿Que los carriles-bici son “simbólicos y a largo plazo dañinos”? ¿Pero en qué está pensando esta gente?

En fin…

Instead they have implemented measures which seek to reduce motor traffic speeds, restore cycle permeability to sections of the borough where this had been lost (principally to egregious one-way systems), operate a comprehensive programme of cycle training and support a general acceptance for peoples’ right to cycle on the highway. Hackney has hardly any green painted cycle lanes and the few dedicated segregated cycle tracks that do exist tend to be there to facilitate cycle access where other motor traffic is not permitted, for example restoring permeability via a cycle contra-flow along a previously barred one-way street.

The restoration of two-way working to the Shoreditch Gyratory, a formerly inner city triangle that stifled non-motorised traffic movement across the borough, has seen permeable access restored. It may be argued that this has assisted ongoing economic development to this previously unfashionable part of the city. Hackney alone is now home to twelve bicycle shops, where in recent years there were only three or four, which says something about the potential economic impact that promotion of cycling as transport can bring to an area.

Conduct a survey on what most non-cycling people want before they will consider riding a bike and this list is likely to include cycle lanes, green paint and segregated cycle tracks. But ask Mr Parsons and other members of his group in Hackney and the list will be quite different. It will involve offering a comprehensive cycle training programme, lower motor traffic speeds, easy direct travel from A to B by bike and generally accepting that we can share highway space.

Within The Design Manual for Roads and Bridges the Hierarchy of Provision for cyclists places traffic reduction, speed reduction, and redistribution of the carriageway via bus lanes and wide nearside lanes among the interventions to consider first when developing infrastructure for cyclists. The large increase in bicycle use happening within Hackney demonstrates that when thoughtfully implemented with other complimentary measures this hierarchy works extremely well.

Gary Cummins was a London Cycling Campaign borough co-ordinator in Hackney’s neighbouring borough Tower Hamlets between 1994-2000. Following studying for an MSc in Transport Planning, he is now an Assistant Transport Planner at JMP.

Txarli

CiudadCiclista | Lista de correo | Wiki CC

No sólo en Londres. También en Dublín las bicis están tomando la calle sin preocupación por los carriles-bici en que las Autoridades las quieren encerrar.

Make a Comment

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Google+ photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google+. Cerrar sesión / Cambiar )

Conectando a %s

13 comentarios to “Los ciclistas en Londres “activamente en contra” de la construcción de carriles-bici.”

RSS Feed for El carril-bici es el opio del pueblo ciclista Comments RSS Feed

Txarli,

Interesante. Añadir que hace unas semanas leí en el Evening Standard que algunas compañías en Londres están entrenando a sus conductores (reciclado, recogida de basura, etc) a circular conviviendo con las bicicletas. La oficina del alcalde de Londres y las distintas local authorities individualmente estan haciendo un esfuerzo por promover el uso de la bicicleta tanto a nivel individual, como corporativo. Por ejemplo, los carteros en muchas authorities reparten el correo en bici, lo que resulta eficiente y ecológico. Y que yo sepa, ningún colectivo de carteros se ha erigido a pedir carriles bici. Se ve que el correo lo pueden repartir divinamente yendo por la calzada como cualquier otro vehículo.

Alguna de las medidas que quiere promover el alcalde me parecen menos interesantes, como permitir a ciclistas circular en direccion prohibida en algunas calles del centro. Habrá que ver cómo lo señalizan, pero por lo que a mi respecta, dejaré que el alcalde lo pruebe primero, y me lo pensaré… Yo sigo por mi carril.

Lo que me parece interesante, y hay algunos en Londres y muchos en Amsterdam, son carriles de circulación para bicicletas en autovías que conectan núcleos urbanos. En lugar de ir por la autovía pegada al arcén, que es molesto por el ruido y la velocidad de los coches, hay unos pasos paralelos que confluyen en las carreteras de entrada a las ciudades. De este modo, la alternativa de la bicicleta al tren de cercanías es aún más real de lo que es ahora.

Cualquier persona que haya utilizado una bicicleta en su vida como medio de transporte sabe que los carriles bici son un gasto inutil y frívolo del dinero del contribuyente. Coincido con Txarli en que son el mayor peligro a la implantación de la bicicleta como medio de transporte viable y alternativo al transporte público y al coche privado.

Los ayuntamientos, en lo que tienen que gastarse el dinero es en promocionar el uso de la bicicleta haciendo que el resto de los usuarios convivan con la bicicleta, bajando los límites de velocidad en ciudad, facilitando la instalación de zonas en las que se pueda dejar la bicicleta segura. Haciendo campañas para que los ciclistas sepan cómo compartir el espacio con los otros vehículos. Porque hay muchos ciclistas que es un milagro que no tengan más accidentes.

He leido muchas veces en este blog a gente decir, ‘yo no me meto por tal y tal con la bici’ para justificar un carril bici. Pero vamos a ver, habrá rutas alternativas a ‘tal y tal’. Si alguien no se siente seguro en carreteras con mucho tráfico, que vaya por otras rutas, o que desmonte y vaya por la acera un trecho. Con práctica, se verá más y más seguro en medio de tráfico denso. Lo que no es plan es dejar la bici en casa esperando a que a uno le marquen la ruta con pinturita- y despues va por el circuito como un caballito de tio vivo.

Yo es que me asombro con algunos de los comentarios que leo aqui. Yo he circulado en ciudades españolas y hasta ahora nadie me ha gritado, insultado o intentado echarme fuera de la carretera. Hombre, siempre hay el tipico bestia que te adelanta imprudentemente porque no quiere ir detrás de una bici. Fíjate tú, dos minutos que han ganado al viaje. Menudos macho men! De hecho he visto más agresividad en Londres donde los taxistas y los autobuseros son asesinos potenciales.

Repito, la solución es ganar confianza circulando, no dejar la bici en casa.

Pues mira, cada vez coincido más con el planteamiento “Carril Bici = Mierda” que le gusta tanto a Txarlie, aunque con reservas.
También coincido con lo de ganar confianza circulando por la calzada y evitar tramos conflictivos.
Medidas reales no siempre son recaudatorias, y nuestros políticos están demasiado enganchados al dinero como para dejarlo de golpe.
Ahora que seguramente Chicago nos gane las olimpiadas de 2016, Madrid está condenado a no tener lo “600 kilómetros de carriles bici” que prometió Gallardón, con lo que seguramente lo de implantar la bici en la capital se quede un poco para las próximas generaciones (o elecciones, lo que llegue antes).
Pedaleros saludos!

Estas creando escuela Txarly xD.

Yo también estoy de acuerdo, un “”curioso”” ejemplo este de los londinenses. Sin carril bici hoyga.

Mojarrison:

cada vez coincido más con el planteamiento “Carril Bici = Mierda”

Coño, Mojarrison, a ver si va a resultar que sí que somos capaces de entendernos.

Paseante:

Estas creando escuela Txarly

Ya me extrañaría. Al final lo único que crea escuela es Mamá Realidad, que acaba por imponerse por muchas tontolculeces que anden diciendo los que quieren hacerse una realidad a su medida. Lo único sorprendente es que haya hecho falta tanto tiempo para que alguien se decidiese a decirles las cosas mínimamente claras a los carril-panolis, que todavía, ya tan creciditos, continúan empeñados en creer (y en hacer creer a la parroquia) que los carril-reyes magos van a venir a resolvernos la vida.

“que los carril-reyes magos van a venir a resolvernos la vida”

¿te resuelve la vida algo referente a la bicicleta? Que suerte tienes, oye. Sigo pensando que te tomas esto demasiado en serio… pero bueno. Sí que es cierto lo que dice Mojarrison… lo de las aceras bici es un poco tontería, sí… en todo caso yo me encontraría más a gusto con carriles bici como los de Copenague, en la calzada. Vamos, como el carril bus pero para bicis… lo que se está haciendo en Madrid es una gilipollez. Y lo que es peor, ni siquiera se va a terminar, como también dice Mojarrison.

En cuanto al planteamiento general, sigo insistiendo en que deberías tener en cuenta que no todo el mundo es como tú, que no todo el mundo aguanta la cafrería de los coches, que no todo el mundo va tranquilo y a gusto en la calzada y, sin embargo, les gustaría desplazarse en bici. Y esas personas se asustan si un coche les adelanta a 50 km/h dejando 20 cm de distancia, que es algo de lo más común. ¿Qué a ti no te asusta? Posfale, tu mismo, pero estaría bien que hasta los niños pudiesen desplazarse por la ciudad en bici… reconocerás que en las condiciones actuales no es posible.

Una solución sería reducir el número de coches y su velocidad, devolver la ciudad a los peatones y a las bicicletas y dejarse de carriles bici. Si opinas eso, estaría totalmente de acuerdo contigo. Pero como eso NO va a ocurrir de una sola vez, los carriles bici (que no las aceras bici de Madrid) serían un buen paso intermedio.

“pero estaría bien que hasta los niños pudiesen desplazarse por la ciudad en bici… reconocerás que en las condiciones actuales no es posible”.

En las condiciones actuales no es posible. Ni será posible mientras vivamos en estas grandes aglomeraciones urbanas dependientes donde la movilidad es la actividad prioritaria en el “espacio público”

“Una solución sería reducir el número de coches y su velocidad, devolver la ciudad a los peatones y a las bicicletas y dejarse de carriles bici. Si opinas eso, estaría totalmente de acuerdo contigo. Pero como eso NO va a ocurrir de una sola vez, los carriles bici (que no las aceras bici de Madrid) serían un buen paso intermedio”.

Los carriles bici no son ningún paso intermedio. Los carriles bici son carriles bici. Los pasos intermedios consistirían en, por ejemplo, que técnicos y políticos reconociesen su error y, apartir de ahí, dejar de crecer urbanísticamente.

Los carriles bici no son un freno urbanístico. Si son un paso intermedio, lo son para legitimar pseodosoluciones contra las consecuencias evidentes del crecimiento del transporte motorizado de personas y mercancías.

De Jordi para Eulez

Eulez:

Sigo pensando que te tomas esto demasiado en serio… pero bueno.

Y yo sigo pensando que vosotros os tomais esto con una frivolidad vergonzosa… pero bueno.

lo que se está haciendo en Madrid es una gilipollez. Y lo que es peor, ni siquiera se va a terminar

Coño, pues la más reciente nota de prensa de Pedalibre no decía nada sobre que fuese una jilipollez. ¿Por qué será?

Por otro lado, si es una jilipollez, mejor que no se termine, ¿no crees?

Y esas personas se asustan si un coche les adelanta a 50 km/h dejando 20 cm de distancia, que es algo de lo más común.

Recoño, ¿y por qué a mí no me adelantan a 20 cm de distancia? Aquí hay algo que falla, colega.

no todo el mundo es como tú, que no todo el mundo aguanta la cafrería de los coches, que no todo el mundo va tranquilo y a gusto en la calzada y, sin embargo, les gustaría desplazarse en bici.

Uno no sabe ni por donde empezar para responder a eso. Empecemos pues diciendo que “desplazarse en bici” no es un derecho humano porque sí, exactamente igual que tampoco es un derecho humano “desplazarse en coche”: es una elección personal. Si uno hace esa elección, adquiere unas obligaciones: aprender a pilotar correctamente el vehículo que ha elegido, sea ese una bici o un coche. El proceso de aprender a conducir una bici es muy parecido al de aprender a conducir un coche: uno empieza por calles tranquilas y en horarios relajados, y va mejorando su habilidad y conquistando la ciudad poco a poco. Decir que los ciclistas novatos tienen derecho a que se haga una infraestructura específica para ellos es tan completamente ridículo como decir que los automovilistas novatos tienen derecho a que les hagan un “Carril-L” sólo para ellos por toda la ciudad, hasta que puedan quitarse la “L” del cristal de atrás.

Y de las tonterías esas del derecho de los niños a ir en bici, y de los carriles-bici como “paso intermedio”, mejor ni hablamos ahora. Jordi ya te ha dicho algunas cosas sobre ello.

[…] en otros países más avanzados, tras el autobús ateo ha llegado la bici […]

[…] Creo que tenemos una foto de este pibe aquí. En todo caso, está claro que no vive en Hackney. […]

Txarli,

I’m sorry I can’t respond to you in Spanish my language is just not good enough!

Whilst I know we have our differences about cycling infrastructure I thought I’d point out a couple of interesting points about Hackney, a borough I know very well as I live on it’s border:

There are no Underground lines in Hackney and as a consequence it has always had one of the highest cycling modal shares in London.

There ARE segregated paths in Hackney; specifically the route that leads from Broadway Market to Hackney Road is very heavily used.

Permeability is, whilst very useful, part of a raft of measures you need to make cycling more desirable (and I know that you and I disagree on what these measures should be)

Hackney’s modal share recently collapsed from 8% to 4% and therefore there are questions surrounding just how successful the measures outlines above actually are / how reliable the statistics are.

Lastly, even 8% modal share is hardly mass cycling in my opinion.

With best regards, (and standing by to get flamed)

Mark

standing by to get flamed

Why? Did you come here à la agent provocateur? Is there in your comment something flammable? You should be careful with that…

Let’s see…

There are no Underground lines in Hackney and as a consequence it has always had one of the highest cycling modal shares in London.

Meaning: “Well, the conditions in Hackney are such that its having the highest cycle modal share in London is to be expected and by no means a big deal at all”, uh?

You know what? Denmark and The Netherlands “have always had the highest cycle modal shares in Europe” (I am just using your very words) since well before the segregation madness, so I guess that their having “the highest modal share in Europe” now is in fact not such a big deal either, uh?

There ARE segregated paths in Hackney;

What exactly is a “segregated path”? Link to a definition, please, because it might just happen that we are not even agreeing on the meaning of words. You can find our definition of “segregation” here, but I’m afraid it is in Spanish. Sorry.

Then, even if we find that we are talking about the same thing, so what, if “There ARE segregated paths in Hackney”? Of course there is segregated shit everywhere: that is exactly what we are fighting against. Do your think that my post is trying to say that there aren’t, or are you by chance implying that the “London’s highest level of cycle” in Hackney is somehow due (apart from the “always having had it”) to the whatever amount of segregation they suffer? If not, why, exactly, are you trying to say?

specifically the route that leads from Broadway Market to Hackney Road is very heavily used.

Oh, my Goodness! so we have a “heavily used” (wow!) “segregated path” (whatever that is for you) from Broadway Market to Hackney Road? Do you mean in this street, which appears to be the shortest route, or some other of similar awful cycling difficulty “from Broadway Market to Hackney Road”? Dare I bother you asking for a link, a map, an image or line in Google Maps, or shall we take your word about the “heavily used” (and presumably wonderful) segregated path from Broadway Market to Hackney Road?

Permeability is, whilst very useful, part of a raft of measures you need to make cycling more desirable…

Ha ha ha ha… Do you know what I like about this kind of empty discourse? its transparency. Listening to you guys saying that “X, whilst very useful, is part a raft of measures to promote cycling blah blah blah…” is like watching a boy who comes to his mom trying to chat her up into letting him have the cookie box, without broaching the cookie box subject too early in the talk. You listen to the illustrated segregationist ideologues and you know for a fact that the segregated candy, like the cookie box, will be the end point of just about anything they say.

You are like kids. Maybe you were cute forty years ago, but now you (your tribe, not you personally) are just pathetic.

(Is that “flaming”?)

Hackney’s modal share recently collapsed from 8% to 4% and therefore there are questions surrounding just how successful the measures outlines above actually are / how reliable the statistics are.

Again: Can You please post a link documenting the “collapse”? I am not the one you can push around looking for links or documents that you don’t bother to provide. A number of bikelaneists have tried that trick (and every other in the book) before you.

And then, when you provide a quality link, we can have some hearty laughter with it.

Lastly, even 8% modal share is hardly mass cycling in my opinion.

Compared with what? What is the cycle modal share in other parts of London, with cycle advocates and cycle policies relaying more towards segregated crap? Any data on that?

Feel free to answer and provide whatever info you whish. Just beware that I am very likely to take some time to reply, as I have other conversations going, notably one awfully neglected with a Dutch/Australian guy I think you are aware of.

Cheers.

Txarli
B*k*l*n*s’R’Sh*t

P.S. I love the irony that you blocked me out of your TL in Twiter, but let your fascination with car crashes drag you here to “be flamed”. Man, do you have chutzpah.

[…] Creo que tenemos una foto de este pibe aquí. En todo caso, está claro que no vive en Hackney. […]


Where's The Comment Form?

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

A %d blogueros les gusta esto: